Get Better STAT!

I’m proud to say that, I played golf for Penn State in college.  The best golfer to graduate from the Penn State Women’s golf team is currently on the LPGA Tour, her name is Katie Futcher.   My college coach, Denise St. Pierre,  shared this visual with me, it’s the one that Katie uses. Ever since I have used it to evaluate my game. 

If you did not get a chance, my last two postings were titled “the need for speed” and “hit your mark”.
In this visual, the red box represents the fairway and the circle represents the green.  In conjunction with the accuracy/distance blog,  the red line down the middle of the fairway represents the accuracy line (how accurate are you hitting your tee shot?)  The end of the box bisects the middle of the green. This portion of the box will represent your distance control on the green. Since the diagram is a circle, every green will not look like this,measure your statistics as if the center of the circle is in relation to the hole.  From here, plot each shot you take during the round.

This is an example of 9 holes,  the numbers with astricks  *  represent your approach shots.   At the end of your round you can evaluate which area you tend to miss a shot.  

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Megan Padua is a PGA Certified Instructor, LPGA Member, TPI Level 2 Junior Golf Certified, a TPI Level 1 Golf Professional, Coutour Certified Putter Fitting Professional,  and a Staff Teaching Professional with JRG/TSGA programs at the Raven Golf Club Phoenix

Divvy Up!

At The Raven Golf Club – Phoenix, we are very fortunate to have a large grass driving range to hit golf balls from.  The divot etiquette is something that you may or may not be familiar with.  If you can make a small adjustment to the way you practice, you will help keep your course in great condition.  Remember that the goal is to hit the golf ball and then the ground.  This video will introduce the appropriate process for preserving grass while practicing on the driving range.

Megan Padua is a Coutour Certified Putter Fitting Professional, a PGA Certified Instructor, LPGA Member, TPI Level 2 Junior Certified and a Staff Teaching Professional with JRG/TSGA programs at the Raven Golf Club Phoenix

Splashdown!

So you’ve hit your ball in a water hazard.  What comes next?  Today’s JRG/TSGA blog will help you with your options from a yellow staked (or painted) water hazard, or a red staked (or painted) lateral water hazard.  An easy way to remember your options is using the Rule of 3 and Rule of 5.

—-Water Hazard – Rule of 3—–

1.  Play the ball as it lies with no penalty.

2.  Play from the previous spot with a one-stroke penalty.

3.  Drop a ball behind the hazard, keeping the point where your ball crossed the hazard line directly between you and the hole, with no restriction on how far back from the hazard you drop, with a one-stroke penalty.  Knowing this option can help you immensely.  Instead of dropping 5 yards behind the hazard, leaving yourself a tricky 50 yard shot over water, go back further until you find a comfortable distance for a full wedge shot.

—-Lateral Water Hazard – Rule of 5—-

1.  Play the ball as it lies with no penalty.

2.  Play from the previous spot with a one-stroke penalty.

3.  Drop a ball behind the hazard, keeping the point where your ball crossed the hazard line directly between you and the hole, with no restriction on how far back from the hazard you drop, with a one-stroke penalty.

4.  Drop a ball outside of the hazard within two club-lengths and not nearer to the hole than the point where it crossed the hazard with a one-stroke penalty.

5.  Drop a ball outside of the hazard within two club-lengths and not nearer to the hole than a point on the opposite side of the hazard the same distance from the hole, with a one-stroke penalty.  This one sounds a little tricky but it’s really not.  If you crossed the hazard line 50 yards from the hole, you have the option to go on the opposite side of  the pond 50 yards from the hole, and take your drop there.  

The next time you find yourself in a hazard, don’t drop your head!  Identify what kind of hazard you’re in, use the Rule of 3 or Rule of 5, and take advantage of the options given to you!

Aaron Olson is Staff Teaching Professional with JRG/TSGA programs at the Raven Golf Club Phoenix. In addition, he is Assistant Director of Nike Junior Golf Camps hosted at the Pebble Beach Resorts on the Monterey Peninsula.  Click Here for more information on private and group coaching with Aaron and the entire JRG/TSGA Staff.